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go to cnn.com/impact. it's on the bottom of your screen there. there you will find the organizations and the way to help those in need. >>> turkish fighter jets scrambled after syrian choppers near the border. a report on what sparked the bomber is next. and the owners of mississippi's only abortion clinic fights it from closing. [ male announcer ] this was how my day began. a little bird told me about a band... ♪ an old man shared some fish stories... ♪ oooh, my turn. ♪ she was in paris, but we talked for hours... everyone else buzzed about the band. there's a wireless mind inside all of us. so, where to next? ♪ so, where to next? what happens when classroom teachers get the training... ...and support they need? schools flourish and students blossom. that's why programs like... ...the mickelson exxonmobil teachers academy... ...and astronaut sally ride's science academy are helping our educators improve student success in math and science. let's shoot for the stars. let's invest in our teachers and inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back. you would think syr
. a live report from virginia just one minute away on cnn. families are getting their first look at what remains of their homes after a deadly wildfire tore through the neighborhoods of colorado springs. roads will be open for several hours allowing families to cautiously examine what's left of their homes. >> just been like a mess because those are people's lives and we are watching it. so my heart goes out to them. >> we should tell you that this area is under a red flag warning today which means a chance a fast moving fire could flare up again. we will go there live for you in a moment, as well. >>> turkey's military said today it scrambled fighter jets and took action after syrian helicopters got a little too close for comfort. turkey has ramped up presence along the border after a fighter jet was shot nine days ago. >>> mexicans are going to the polls today choosing a new president, officials calling it the largest and most complex in the country's history. in mexico city some polls opened late and lines stretched for blocks. polls close in less than three hours. >>> wide spread pow
. the individual mandate has been ruled unconstitutional. >> wrong, wrong, wrong. how did cnn and fox news blow the story? why did they rush to judgment? and what about the pundits who have been saying for months that the health care mandate was toast? >>> it was an extraordinary, an extraordinarily uncomfortable television moment. ann curry bidding farewell to the "today" show couch. >> i love all of our brilliant, brilliant producers. and for all of you who saw me as a groundbreaker, i'm sorry i couldn't carry the ball over the finish line. but man, i did try. >> was the veteran correspondent humiliated by nbc? >>> plus, a magazine article by a woman who quit the obama administration because she couldn't juggle the demands of motherhood strikes a very deep chord. >> no one says any more this is no job for a woman because, a, that's discrimination. but plenty of people say this is no job for a mother. >> but have women in the media trumpeted this because they're all part of a privileged elite? i'm howard kurtz, and this is "reliable sources." >>> let me say at the outset, it is not easy to gra
upheld the health care case. >> here's how it played out on cnn, and it wasn't pretty. >> we're still going through the reading -- the opinion, but i want to bring you the breaking news that according to producer bill mears, the individual mandate is not a valid exercise of the commerce clause. so it appears as if the supreme court justices have struck down the individual mandate. the centerpiece of the health care legislation. >> wow, that's a dramatic moment if, in fact, the supreme court has ruled that the individual mandate is, in fact, unconstitutional. that would be history unfolding now. >> the court striking down that mandate is a dramatic blow to the policy and to the president politically. >> as we're reading through this again, we're reading that the entire law has been upheld, wolf. >> if in fact that is the justification, then it's a huge, huge victory for president obama. >> fox news also started down the wrong path. >> we have breaking news here on the fox newschannel. the individual mandate has been ruled unconstitutional. >> we're getting conflicting information. if y
to wrap it up today. meantime, keep connected with me sgmdcnn. sgmdcnn. i will see you this week on cnn. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> a new law in mississippi takes place, and it could force the state's only remaining abortion clinic to close. >> this storm came upon us very quickly without a great deal of notice. >>> the storm that has left millions without power has now claimed 12 lives. temperatures still in the triple digits. what could to blackout mean for your safety? plus, 23 siblings, and married at 17. i will talk to one woman who spent 50 years in a polygamist family and is now speaking out against it. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm randi kay. it is 5:00 on the west coast and 8:00 a.m. on the east coast. my car said it was 112 in atlanta and it is going to be hotter, and the same today with excessive heat warnings issued for 19 states which is complicating the efforts to get the power back on for millions who lost electricity in storms over the past two days. many cities have cooling centers open to help people get a break from the heat. as for the strong storms
fund. the school fund. brian todd, cnn, washington. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. utility crew us are trying to restore power in areas struck by friday night's deadly storms. close to a million people are facing another hot night in the dark. well, a lot of those outages are in the same places suffering from blistering high temperatures. 20 states issued heat warnings or advisories today and about 1,600 high temperature records have been broken around the country. >>> families are getting their first look at what remains of their homes after a deadly wildfire tore through the neighborhood of colorado springs. roads will be open for several hours allowing families to cautiously examine what's left of their houses. the area is under a red flag warning, which means there is a chance a fast-moving fire could flare up again. >>> some tense moments today after turkey scrambled jets in response to syrian helicopters that approached the border. turkey warned syria not to come close to its air space. >>> i'm sweating up in here. >> yes, he was. for
like a war zone. to find out more on how to help, go to cnn.com/impact. they can use your help. you can find all the organizations and ways that you can help those in need. again, cnn.com/impact. can't say that enough. >>> more now on the heat wave and those power ounls. crews are working around the clock in states from virginia and ohio, maryland, new jersey, trying to get the power back on so tens of thousands of people can cool off. brian todd with the latest now. >> reporter: these are the lifesavers. power company teams scrambling to bring transform es back online. but for millions in the midwest and mid-atlantic, these crews can't work fast enough. >> i hate it. it's horrible. we can't, all our -- in case of an emergency, we can't make a call or anything. >> reporter: in the wake of devastating storms, 20 states are dealing with excessive heat warnings. temperatures over 100 degrees are scorching much of the southeastern u.s. more than a million customers still have no power and that means huge numbers are at risk. >> a heatstroke is when you start having neurological problems. co
on, by it could be days before that happens. cnn's athena jones is live in springfield, virginia, for us, and athena, welcome, and how is the cleanup going? >> good morning, randi. well sh well, the cleanup is going in spits and starts. you can see the debris out here in the medium that is left to be picked up. you can see behind me where a giant tree fell on the power lines here. this tree killed a 27-year-old man on friday night who was driving home from work. it is an example of the kind of thing that the cleanup crews are facing. we were in rockville, maryland, on the other side of washington, d.c. yesterday and there were people out clearing debris, and clearing these giant trees from the road and cutting them down for mulch, but it is a lot they have to do it and they have to do it in the heat today, randi. >> what are the odds that people will get the power back on today? any word on that? >> well, i don't think that you have heard anyone promise that it will be happen today. you can see that this is an extreme situation that we are dealing with something that would take s
to release them into the wild anymore. there are your weird laws of the day. >>> this is cnn breaking news. >>> we want to show you this just in to cnn. take a look at these amazing pictures from one colorado springs neighborhood. these are just coming in to cnn. these pictures show complete devastation, wiped out homes. look at that. you have one frame of one brick home, not even wood home, brick home standing there. everything is completely gone. look across the street you can see a house that is standing that is completely untouched right across the street. it shows how actually discriminating this fire was destroying one home and leaving others untouched. interestingly, too, the lawn in front of that home is green and not charred. the home is completely destroyed. this is coming from a lot of people that were evacuated, the thousands of people evacuated. they are getting the chance to come back. they are being bussed in by the government to take a look at the damage to see if their home was saved or if their home was destroyed or not. let's take a listen in to this video. >> grab that
] >>> this just in to cnn. take a look at some amazing pictures from one colorado springs neighborhood. these are just coming in to cnn. these pictures show pure, utter devastation. these were shot by neighbors. media was not allowed in along with families. what is dramatic is how completely destroyed that one brick home is and right across the street you have other homes in the back there that are standing just fine and the brush in front of the home not really touched. it shows you the fire has been discriminating in terms of the houses it has completely destroyed and those it left untouched. we will talk to our own jim spellman live there for us in about ten minutes with the latest. >>> we have been talking a lot today about the wildfires in colorado. you just saw that video. they aren't just happening in colorado. they are raging across the rocky mountain west. in montana there is a battle to save horses. we are going to bring in sasha with a group that is setting up safe refuge for the horses. she joins us via skype. the work you are doing is amazing. tell us what is going on righ
's all for us tonight. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "early start weekend." >> this was a storm that obviously came upon us very quickly without a great deal of notice. >> the storm that has left millions without power has now claimed 12 lives. temperatures are still in the triple digits. what could the blackout mean for your safety? >>> an abortion-free state. a new law in mississippi takes effect today. could it force the state's only remaining abortion clinic to close. >>> the highest court has made its decision. one governor says he won't comply. i'll talk with florida governor rick scott about why his state is ignoring the health care ruling. >>> and super guppy has landed. carla, the hologram, is ready to help you. and chicago has a new taxi law for your stomach coming up in "cross country." >>> it is sunday, july 1. good morning, everyone. so glad you're with us. i'm randi kaye. we start this morning with a state of emergency. strong storms are being blamed for at least 12 deaths across the east and into the midwest. people killed by downed trees and
, but decided to handle the issues internally. here's what else we are working on for cnn saturday night. a cnn exclusive. he had it all. basketball, money and fame. >> good luck to you. >> he lost it all. jason williams on his rise, his fall, and why he said prison saved his life. >> we can't be her. she is my best student. >> turning a mind eye to mean girl who is turn into meaner women. >> tom cruise katie holmes and the end of tomcat. why some say scientology is to blame for the break up. first we will be direct here. he wants us to be. from first round draft pick to locked up felon. by all accounts, jason williams was a star at the young age of 22. a first round draft pick and few could rival the forward when he was under the net. few people could. it seemed his career had no ceiling. he was only continuing to rocket to even higher heights until 1999. in a game against the atlanta hawks he collided with a teammate and broke his leg. in one moment, his entire career on the court was over. his plummet hit depths unknown and on valentine's day in 2002. he was showing off a shotgun in his new
, and management could face civil and even criminal penalties. george howell, cnn, jackson, mississippi. >>> and a reminder here. coming up in our 8:00 hour, we're going to explore this issue even further. what impact will this have on women? will other states adopt similar laws? we'll talk about that and much more with dr. leroy carhart, an abortion doctor. we'll get his take on all of this. >>> and we also want to know what you think about this -- is mississippi's new abortion clinic law too harsh? is it about health, or is it really about politics? i'd love to know what you think on this topic. you can tweet me, @randi kayecnn. send your comment my way. >>> a bomb blast during a funeral in syria. could a solution be in the works as leaders work to come up with a peace plan? this is new york state. we built the first railway, the first trade route to the west, the greatest empires. then, some said, we lost our edge. well today, there's a new new york state. one that's working to attract businesses and create jobs. a place where innovation meets determination... and businesses lead the
just go to cnn.com/impact. we have a list of organizations that are working with the victims of the fires. every little bit helps. >>> a successful health care insurance executive turns his back on the industry and his career. find out why some are calling him a judas for a decision he made based on his faith. stay in the moment sanya focus lolo, focus let's do this i am from baltimore south carolina... bloomington, california... austin, texas... we are all here to represent the country we love this is for everyone back home it's go time. across america, we're all committed to team usa. >>> one man's faith head him to turn his back on a very successful career in the health care industry. wendell potter wrote about his experience in this book "deadly spin". we spoke last in 2009 shortly after you left your 20 year career. you were the spokesperson for a major insurance company. you told me at that time that you were part of the effort to kill health care reform when they tried that time around. i'm wondering what your thoughts are now in the wake of the supreme court decision
shattered. meteorologist alexandra steele is tracking weather temperatures from the cnn center. i know we were a record high here in atlanta just yesterday and we're above 100 today. >> 106 yesterday in atlanta. it is not unbelievable. it is really unprecedented. we are talking about 45 million people being impacted, 24 states. these are all-time record heat. not talking about just a daybreaking a record, the day for the month, the day for the day. we're talking about all-time record setting temperatures since the 1800s. and the breadth and depth of this is what's so incredibly shattering. from kansas to colorado to the carolinas, 111 in dodge city, kansas. since records were kept from 1874. that's from columbia, nashville, from 1873. really unprecedented. 109 in nashville. 106 in atlanta. looking at the forecast highs for today, temperatures are down a bit. 103 in atlanta. 97. but look at how far it spreads from denver, colorado to albuquerque, to atlanta, to new york and washington. those are today's highs. let me show you tomorrow's highs. we do scrape a little bit off but it's really
. >>> hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. you're in the cnn newsroom. i want to get you up to speed on the day's headlines. canyon fire in colorado. towering flames, as you can see, are sending families fleeing for their homes. the fire has destroyed 350 homes and killed two people. earlier i talked with major neil harlow about the challenges of fighting fire from the air. >> extremely high temperatures. everything is causing these fires to burn hot as they are creates big problems for us. the aircraft doesn't perform, we're flying right to the edge of the envelope. >> there's one bit of good news to tell you about. firefighters now have 100% containment over another colorado fire, the massive hyde park fire, that we've been reporting so much on. >>> new allegations in the jerry sandusky rape case tonight. an e-mail thread involving the university's president and the athletic director. they knew they had a problem with sandusky back as far as 1991 but decided to handle the issues internally. >>> here's what else we're working on for you. >>> tonight a cnn exclusive. he had it all, basketball,
internally. >>> here's what else we're working on for you. >>> tonight a cnn exclusive. he had it all, basketball, money, fame. >> good luck to you, mr. williams. >> until he lost it all. jayson williams on his rise, his fall and why he says prison saved his life. >> it can't be her, she's my best student. >> and turning a blind eye to mean girls who turn into even meaner women. >>> tom cruise and katie holmes and the end of tomkat. why some say scientology is to blame for the latest hollywood breakup. >>> but first we're going to be very direct here because he wants us to be. from first round draft pick to locked-up felon. tonight it's the cnn exclusive. by all accounts jayson williams was a star at the young age of 22, a first round draft pick in 1990. few could rival the 6'10" forward when he was under the net, few people could. it seemed his career had no ceiling, he continued to rocket to higher heights. that was until a game with the atlanta hawks williams collided with stephon marbury and broke his leg. in one moment his entire career on the court was over. his plummet hit dept
got on the cnn blog is from a guy named jaleel. he's married with children, currently on medicaid. he wanted to know how this will decision affect my access to medicaid? >> so as part of getting those 30 million people insured, they want to expand medicaid. that means that they raise the level at which someone qualifies. used to be 100% of poverty level. now it will go up to 133% of poverty level. someone like jalil -- i don't know what his family situation is. but if you're making $14,000 or less roughly, he should qualify for medicaid. in short, the answer to the question is that it shouldn't make a difference really at all. he qualifies now. he should still be able to qualify after it goes into effect. >> the $14,000 for a single person or family? >> for a system person. for a -- single person. for a family, it's closer to $29,000 or $30,000. the number will change closer to 2014. but 133% of poverty level. >> another viewer on the phone now, delee. she's 56, a diabetic. and she recently lost her job. i think she's on the phone. she has a question for you. >> hey. >> hi, sanjay. i
visit cnn.com/impact. thank you for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley. find us on itunes, search state of the union. fareed zakaria gps is next. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. we'll start today's show with american politics in the wake of the supreme court ruling on health care. what does it mean for the presidential race? for health care? what about economics? i have a star studded panel to discuss all of this. then we go overseas to egypt's election of mohamed morsi. what can we expect from an islamist president? two of the top egypt experts tell us. >>> next up, how do you count and catalog 1.2 billion people? i'll ask the man creating a revolutionary biometric id for every one of india's citizens. >> also, the housing bubble caused the crash. will a coming housing boon finally power this anemic recovery? >> first, here's my take. what to do about syria? western military intervention looked fraught with difficulties. but the situation on the ground is a humanitarian nightmare and is creati
that was taking place last thursday. host: dennis has something to say about this, saying that cnn and fox bought a report on health care, saying that they were not about news, but about spain. saying that it is blame time for cnn and their dismal ratings. back to the issue of this los angeles times -- "the l.a. times" editorial. cindy, good morning. caller: how are you? host: fine, thanks. caller: do you not have a job to correct these people who call in? the man from south carolina, this is one of the biggest lies a man ever told. he was not raised but -- by two muslim fathers. he never met his father except one time in his life. you have to stop them from calling in and lying. as far as visions, yes, both of them have visions. the mitt romney vision is to embrace the paul ryan budget. looking at that, the want to take from older people who have worked. the tape from people who cannot get out of their homes. retired people. people without jobs, bringing meals to senior citizens. children getting hot meals. they want to take medicare and turn it into a voucher. mitt romney does not have anything
." plus, cnn's political director mark preston and cnn's conservative contributor will cane. do they actually call you that? i keep adding that. >> i let you describe me. >> he describes himself as a conservative. he says that two parties working together to achieve a solution has created today's problems. >> that's true. >> i don't understand what you're talking about. >> that's true. >> you heard mohammed el-erian say first do no harm. doing nothing before the elections in an environment where we have a 30% chance of recession if you believe him, is doing harm. >> when you say that i think bipartisanship created our problems, what i'm talking about is a historical perspective. we have norm to join us in a few minutes here and will rebut what i have to say. but what i'm saying to you is this combination of democrats and republicans seeking low taxes and high spending is created everything from social security to medicare to no child left behind. i don't think we can look at these across the board and say pump our fist, good job, congress. yes! now we're in a terrible situation,
answer. go to cnn.com/fareed for more of the "gps challenge" and great content from the global public square. if you ever miss a show or gps special, go to itunes.com/fareed. >>> this week's book of the week is "land of promise: an economic history of the united states." by michael lynd, one of the founders of the new america foundation. lindh is a highly intelligent thinker and writing and has given us a revealing history of the american economy, family sizing the crucial role that the state has played in making america an economic superpower. it will unsettle many of your cherished beliefs. >>> now for the "last look." south korean and american troops storming a beach by sea, by air. shells exploding overhead as amphibious vehicles race toward the beach. no, the world hasn't finally run out of patience with north korea. this was just a drill. but the date of the drill was telling. june 25. doesn't ring a bell? it is the 62nd anniversary of the start of the korean war. to add to the symbolism, smoke bombs dropped in the shape of a "v" for victory. the correct answer to our "gps chall
to compete with "the new york times" or with cnn. so i don't really see very much of that happening for us. >> morgan entrekin, what changes do you see coming down the road that we should be aware of? >> you know, i agree with what jonathan says in terms of the form changing some. we've done one enhanced e-book or app with an australian scientist named tim flannery. he did a book that's a natural history of the planet from the big bang until today, and it lent itself to, you know, sort of graphs and videos and putting a lot of the scientific stuff in. we have a new media company called arcade sunshine, and they produced a really brilliant piece. but what my experience of using it was television sort of like reading a book and -- it was sort of like reading a book and watching a documentary at the same time. so i think that somebody who's 23 probably is more fluent in multitasking or absorbing media in a different way. i think with the change, change in form will happen. i mean, if you look at network television or some of the fiction that's published now, 50 years ago those forms would hav
. according to cnn ee-mails show he -- e-mails show he supported a plan stotalk to san -- to talk to sandusky before reporting him to police. they are facing charges are not properly reported suspected child abuse. spanier has not been charged. >>> down in the dump, literally. the new program in the east bay that lets residents drop off certain items for free. >> and problems ahead for city college of san francisco. why the community college may lose its accreditation. >>> a little trash talking in the east bay. waste management of alameda county helped a bulky item drop-off in san leandro in effort to keep people from trashing streets. the city received seven thousand complaints about illegal dumping last year. >> they come out to bring their appliance, mattresses, stuff that can be recycled. and this is a free day for them. they can drop off that stuff. >> they are set to be held every three months >>> the accreditation for city college of san francisco could be on the line due to budget cuts. the chronicle reports city college has too few experienced administrators and is low on financial
tonight. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "early start weekend." >> this was a storm that obviously came upon us very quickly without a great deal of notice. >> the storm that has left millions without power has now claimed 12 lives. temperatures are still in the triple digits. what could the blackout mean for your safety? >>> an abortion-free state. a new law in mississippi takes effect today. could it force the state's only remaining abortion clinic to close. >>> the highest court has made its decision. one governor says he won't comply. i'll talk with florida governor rick scott about why his state is ignoring the health care ruling. >>> and super guppy has landed. carla, the hologram, is ready to help you. and chicago has a new taxi law for your stomach coming up in "cross country." >>> it is sunday, july 1. good morning, everyone. so glad you'reh
. according to cnn, they were ready to report sandusky to police for the thought shower incident with a boy back in 2001 that they agreed to keep quiet after talking to a former head coach, joe paterno. the e-mail suggests there was concern that the school would be vulnerable. >>> after a fast-moving wildfire threatens their community, thousands of colorado homeowners are being allowed to go home. right now the 26 square mile wildfire is considered the largest in colorado's history and it's almost half contained. though firefighters are lifted evacuation orders and allowing neighbors to tour the area and take stock of the damage. many people find that they have nothing to return to. >> the most important thing was our lives, my husband and i at our dog. the thing that i will miss the most is just just thinking about our neighbors and how much i'm going to miss them because we had just amended his neighbors. i'm really hoping that they revealed. >> fire crews say the flames could get worse because the weather is getting hotter and drier. >>> it was a day made for arguably the best swimmer on
of "the next list." you can see us every sunday at 2:00 p.m. eastern right here on cnn. >> the exclusive interview three years in the making. the one person who knew michael jackson better than anyone else. his mother, catherine jackson. >> every day i think about michael. michael looked back at the times and said he was abused. they call it abuse, but sometimes if it wasn't for the strap, what would this world be like today? >> did you ever hope he would find true love? >> i always thought about that, but michael seemed happy. he found a lot of joy in his children. >> the talent michael hid from the world. >> he loved art a lot. he loved paintings and water colors and even crayons. >> her explosive theory about conrad murray. >> here did a terrible thing. there might have been others involved. >> catherine jackson in an extraordinary hour. the interview starts now. tonight an extraordinary look at michael jackson's private through his artwork. he started drawing as a child and new revelations about the iconic singer. much is kept in a airport hangar in los angeles. joining me now in an
spanier helped cover up a report of abuse against jerry sandusky. according to cnn ee-mails show he -- e-mails show he supported a plan stotalk to san -- to talk to sandusky before reporting him to police. they are facing charges are not properly reported suspected child abuse. spanier has not been charged. >>> down in the dump, literally. the new program in the east bay that good morning! wow. want to start the day with something heart healthy and delicious? you're a talking bee... honey nut cheerios has whole grain oats that can help lower cholesterol. and it tastes good? sure does! right... ♪ wow. delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. fiber one. almost tastes like one of jack's cereals. uh, forgot jack's cereal. [ jack ] what's for breakfast? uh, try the number one! i've never heard of that. [ wife ] it's great. it's a sweet honey cereal, you'll love it. yeah, this is pretty good. are you guys alright? yeah. [ male announcer ] half a days worth of fiber. not that anyone has to kn
. that's all for us tonight. >>> hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. you're in the cnn newsroom. i want to get you up to speed on the day's headlines. canyon fire in colorado. towering flames, as you can see, are sending families fleeing for their homes. the fire has destroyed 350 homes and killed two people. earlier i talked with major neil harlow about the challenges of fighting fire from the air. >> extremely high temperatures. everything is causing these fires to burn hot as they are creates big problems for us. the aircraft doesn't perform, we're flying right to the edge of the envelope. >> there's one bit of good news to tell you about. firefighters now have 100% containment over another colorado fire, the massive hyde park fire, that we've been reporting so much on.
here on cnn. >> tonight, the exclusive interview three years in the making. the one person who knew michael jackson better than anybody else, his mother, catherine. >> every morning, all through the day. i think about michael. >> catherine jackson speaks out on michael's childhood. >> so michael looked back at those times and they said he was abused. well, they call it abuse, but sometimes, if it wasn't for the strap, what would the world be like today? >> did you ever hope he would find true love? >> i always thought about that, but michael seemed happy. he found a lot of joy in his children. >> the talent that michael hid from the world. >> michael loved art a lot. he loved paintings, he loved water colors he loved even the crayons. >> and her explosive theory about conrad murray. >> there might have been others involved. i don't know that, but i feel that. >> catherine jackson with piers morgan starts now. >> tonight, an extraordinary look at michael jackson's private life through his deeply personal artwork. he started drawing when he was a child. the pictures offer new revelati
for joining us. if you would like to help invictims of the colorado tires, visit cnn.com/impact. thank you for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley. find us on itunes, search state of the union. fareed zakaria gps is next. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. we'll start today's show with american politics in the wake of the supreme court ruling on health care. what does it mean for the presidential race? for health care? what about economics? i have a star studded panel to discuss all of this. then we go overseas to egypt's election of mohamed morsi. what can we expect from an islamist president? two of the top egypt experts tell us. >>> next up, how do you count and catalog 1.2 billion people? i'll ask the man creating a revolutionary biometric id for every one of india's citizens. >> also, the housing bubble caused the crash. will a coming housing boon finally power this anemic recovery? >> first, here's my take. what to do about syria? western military intervention looked fraught with difficulties. but th
, and on september 19, jeffrey tubein, legal analyst for cnn and the new yorker, will discuss his book, the oath, the obama white house, and the supreme court. if you would like to receive an e-mail about up coming book wraps there's a list outside so please sign up and we'll keep you in touch on upcoming book wraps. >> all of our book wraps here benefit the national press club journalism institute which is why we restrict outside books. copies of tim's book may be purchased if you haven't done so already, outside in the hallway. >> please do, thank you. >> joining tim on the panel this evening is chip cronkite, a producer, editor and filmmaker and the son of walter cronkite. chip was last here as a teenager in 1973 when his father received the first fourth estate award from the national press club and chip, glad to have you back and don't wait so long before coming back again. >> next to chip is david mariness. now associate editor at the washington post, co-author of two books and author of the book, president barack obama, the story. and next to david is tim wendelly, author of nine books, in
of foolish. host: the "new york post" points out that mark whitaker said he was disgusted after cnn it mistakenly reported first that the supreme court had overturned the law and david hinckley looking at the ratings troubles with cnn but the biggest buzz they got was from its healthcare ruling gaffe. you want to get the story first, you know and you want to get it right. guest: it is a problem. we live and die by hits and being quick is the way to be first and being quick is also the way to be wrong. guest: i work for politico and nobody ever accused us of being slow to jump on a story. but on thursday morning we had reporters all over the court and outside the court and people in the newsroom and we waited until we had heard what the justice, what justice roberts said and had read the decision. you needed to read to page four of the decision to get to what actually happened. we made the decision and going in it thursday morning and then as everything was happening, it was about 10:20, that we would wait the extra three or four or even 10 minutes to make sure we got it right. but i
a statement on this. back in february at the cnn debate, this is what he said about the arizona law. check it out. >> you know, i think you see a model here in arizona. they passed a law here that says, that says that people who come here and try to find work, that the employer is required to look them up e-verify. this system allows employers in arizona to know who is here illegally. going back to the question that was asked. the right course for america to drop these lawsuits against arizona and other states that are trying to do the job that barack obama isn't doing and i will drop those lawsuits on day one. >> and then, i want to read you mitt romney's statement after arizona on monday. today's decision underscores a need to work in a bipartisan fashion to pursue a national immigration strategy. i believe each state has the duty and right to preserve our borders and no where in that statement is an explicit statement of whether he supports the court's decisionçy to strik down those provisions or whether he supports legislation like this and i want you to talk about where you see the r
times", cnn -- they got the headline wrong really quick. >> david pietrusza, going back to 1920, herbert hoover 12 democratic primaries? two yes, new hampshire and michigan. he had some trouble deciding what he wants. he had been raised as a republican. there we not a lot of democrats in his hometown of west branch, iowa. the only one he could remember was the town drunk, which was very illustrative to him as to what the parties were about. he had been a progressive to tr he had been a member of the wilson administration has domestic food administrator. he had gone with wilson to her side, think john maynard keynes said he was the only guy who came out with the reputation of his enhanced. and he is a great admirer of wilson. he could've easily flop to the democratic party that year, but he says, look, you have the democratic party, they are composed of three wings. southern reactionaries, big-city croaks, and agrarian nuts. and he says i don't want any rt of them and i think also he didn't want to be part of a bloodbath where he would be carrying the flag for a party which was going down
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